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January 23 - 25 2015, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

ASA PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2015

February 07 - 08 2015, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

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June 26 - 28 2015, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Annual Perioperative Surgical Home Summit

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FDA MEDWATCH ALERTS

November 21, 2014

FDA MedWatch - Respironics California, Esprit V1000 and V200 Ventilators: Class I Recall - Power Failure May Occur

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FDA MedWatch Respironics California Esprit V1000 and V200 Ventilators Class I Recall

November 07, 2014

FDA MedWatch - Nellcor Puritan Bennett, 980 Ventilator System: Class I Recall - Software Issue May Stop Ventilator

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FDA MedWatch Nellcor Puritan Bennett 980 Ventilator System Class I Recall

October 25, 2014

FDA MedWatch - Intravia Containers by Baxter: Recall - Particulate Matter

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FDA MedWatch Intravia Containers by Baxter Recall

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Anesthesiology Journal and Other Scientific Press Releases

News Items By Date

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Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Reported opioid abuse in pregnant women more than doubles in 14 years

The number of pregnant women who abuse or are dependent on opioids (narcotics) jumped 127 percent in 14 years, leading to an increased risk of maternal death and stillbirth among other serious problems, according to a review of more than 57 million American women admitted for delivery. The results were published in the December issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®).

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Friday, October 24, 2014

Combination treatment provides better improvement for neck pain than stand-alone treatment

People seeking relief from neck pain recover similarly with pain medication and physical therapy, epidural steroid injections, or combination of all of these, suggests a randomized study published in the November issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®).

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Getting healthier before surgery gives patients a jump start on recovery

Following a conditioning, nutritional, and relaxation program before surgery is more helpful than waiting until after surgery to rehabilitate, suggests a new study. Colorectal cancer patients who participated in a “prehabilitation” program before surgery recovered more quickly than those who only did traditional rehabilitation afterward, according to research published in the November issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®).

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Pain after surgery greatly decreased in the last 10 years

A new study shows that pain severity among post-surgical patients has decreased by 24 percent since 2003. The study, presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting, shows vast improvements in the field of pain management for surgical patients.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Large study delivers message to expectant mothers: Epidural, spinal anesthesia safe choices for relieving pain

Women seeking pain relief during childbirth should be comforted to know that epidural and spinal anesthesia are extremely safe, suggests a study of more than 80,000 women that reviewed anesthesia complications during obstetrical care. Data on anesthesia adverse events collected through the Anesthesia Quality Institute’s (AQI) National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR) are being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Knee replacement patients benefit when physician anesthesiologists quarterback care

Knee replacement patients go home sooner, are highly satisfied and incur less cost when a physician anesthesiologist coordinates care, suggests research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Researchers find higher incidence of surgery-related breathing problems in African-American children

Ethnicity may play a role in the occurrence of breathing problems during and after surgery, suggests preliminary results from a new study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Moms-to-be with low vitamin D levels could have more painful labors

Pregnant women with low vitamin D levels experience an increased amount of pain during labor, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting. Vitamin D deficiency has long been associated with depression and pain, but this is the first study to demonstrate its association with increased consumption of pain medication during childbirth.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Take note: Study shows jazz and silence help reduce heart rate after surgery

Researchers are one step closer to confirming what people in New Orleans have known for decades: Jazz is good for you. Patients undergoing elective hysterectomies who listened to jazz music during their recovery experienced significantly lower heart rates, suggests a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Physician anesthesiologists find opportunity to reduce carbon footprint

Often overlooked in estimates of the carbon footprint created by the health care industry, inhaled anesthetics contribute significantly to greenhouse gas emissions, suggests research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting. Switching to different types of anesthesia can reduce anesthesia-related emissions by more than 11 times, the study found.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

An end to needle phobia: device could make painless injections possible

Imagine no tears during infant vaccines and no fear of the needle for those old enough to know what’s coming. Such painless injections could be possible with a device that applies pressure and vibration while the needle is inserted in the skin, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Barriers lead to poor pain control in Latino children after surgery

More than two-thirds of children from low-income Latino families don’t receive adequate pain control when they go home after surgery, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting. Obstacles to appropriate pain management include language barriers, misconceptions about pain management and a preference for alternative therapies, the study found.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Patients with catastrophizing disorder more likely to develop chronic pain after surgery

Patients with a psychological cognitive disorder known as catastrophizing are more likely to develop persistent, chronic pain after surgery, according to new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting. Pain catastrophizing occurs when a patient has an irrational and illogical focus on pain, perceiving that it is worse than it actually is.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Knowing the roles of physician anesthesiologists can give patients a better experience and outcome

Most surgical patients know a physician anesthesiologist will “put them to sleep,” but what they don’t realize is that this medical doctor plays a major role in preparing them for the operation. Just as important, these physicians keep them safe and preserve their health during surgery and help them recover as quickly and as comfortably as possible, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Monday, October 13, 2014

Common anesthetic can reduce chronic pain after mastectomy

More than two-thirds of women who have had mastectomies struggle with persistent pain, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Breast cancer patients who receive a common local anesthetic during surgery are less likely to experience chronic pain following mastectomy, suggests a new study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Sunday, October 12, 2014

Chewing gum while fasting before surgery is safe, study finds

It is well known that patients should avoid eating and drinking before surgery to help prevent complications while under anesthesia. But is it safe to chew gum? Although chewing gum significantly increases the volume of liquids in the stomach, it is safe to administer sedatives or anesthesia to patients who have chewed gum while fasting before surgery, reports a new study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Sunday, October 12, 2014

Huge registry shows anesthesia complication rates dropped by more than half in four years

Anesthesia-related complications decreased by more than half in four years, according to the Anesthesia Quality Institute’s (AQI) National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR) of more than 3.2 million anesthesia cases. The results are being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting.

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Saturday, October 11, 2014

Common anesthetic procedure dramatically improves well being of veterans with PTSD

A single application of a common anesthetic procedure could be the answer to alleviating anxiety, depression and psychological pain in those suffering from chronic, extreme post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

New research suggests sleep apnea screening before surgery

Scheduled for surgery?  New research suggests that you may want to get screened and treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before going under the knife.  According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock.

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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Opioid users breathe easier with novel drug to treat respiratory depression

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally.  A study published in the September issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), found that a new therapeutic drug, GAL-021, may reverse or prevent respiratory depression, or inadequate breathing, in patients taking opioid medication without compromising pain relief or increasing sedation.

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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Studies promoting use of antidepressants for postoperative pain may be premature, review finds

Antidepressants are known to provide effective pain relief for various chronic pain conditions; however, the jury is still out on their use in treating the millions of patients who suffer from acute or chronic pain following surgery.  A first-of-its-kind literature review published in the September issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), suggests although a majority of studies report positive outcomes, there is currently insufficient evidence to support the clinical use of antidepressants for the treatment of postoperative pain.

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Monday, August 04, 2014

Statement on Obstetrical Complications and Maternal Outcomes

“The study published today in Health Affairs regarding variability in obstetrical complications demonstrates the need for constructive efforts to improve care for women and babies across America. Not surprisingly, the study found remarkable levels of variability between low-performing and high-performing hospitals. American women, and their families, deserve better."

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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Major dopamine system helps restore consciousness after general anesthesia, study finds

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works.  A study in the August issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), found stimulating a major dopamine-producing region in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), caused rats to wake from general anesthesia, suggesting that this region plays a key role in restoring consciousness after general anesthesia.  Activating this region at the end of surgery could provide a novel approach to proactively induce consciousness from anesthesia in surgical patients, researchers say. 

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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Surgical patients more likely to follow medication instructions when provided a simple, instruction sheet, study finds

A study in the July issue of Anesthesiology revealed that patients who receive a simple, multicolor, standardized medication instruction sheet before surgery are more likely to comply with their physician’s instructions and experience a significantly shorter post-op stay in recovery. These findings are important because surgical patients often fail to follow their doctor’s medication instructions for preexisting conditions such as diabetes and hypertension on the day they are having surgery – a costly mistake that can lead to surgery cancellation, complications and longer hospital stays.

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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Researchers identify new compound to treat depression

There is new hope for people suffering from depression.  Researchers have identified a compound, hydroxynorketamine (HNK), that may treat symptoms of depression just as effectively and rapidly as ketamine, without the unwanted side effects associated with the psychoactive drug, according to a study in the July issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®).  Interestingly, use of HNK may also serve as a future therapeutic approach for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, the authors note.

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Monday, June 16, 2014

Physician anesthesiologists identify five common tests and procedures patients should avoid

Proving that less really is more, five specific tests or procedures commonly performed in anesthesiology that may not be necessary and, in some cases should be avoided, will be published online June 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.  The “Top-five” list was created by the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®) for inclusion in the ABIM Foundation’s Choosing Wisely® campaign.

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Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Laboring under misconceptions: Epidural myths may keep women from reliable pain management

It’s one of the most effective, safest and widely used forms of pain management for women in labor, yet there are misconceptions about epidurals, a recent study shows. From fears of permanent back pain to allegations of potential harm to the baby, many women still harbor mistaken beliefs about epidurals.

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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Serious complications from anesthesia very rare during childbirth, new study finds

Expectant mothers concerned about receiving an epidural, spinal or general anesthesia during childbirth can breathe a little easier.  According to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare, occurring in one out of every 3,000 deliveries.

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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Surgical safety checklists significantly reduce post-op complications, new review finds

Patients experience fewer postoperative complications when a surgical safety checklist is used by their surgical team, reports the first large-scale review on the subject published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®). By following a simple checklist, health care providers can minimize the most common postoperative risks such as wound infection and blood loss.

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Tuesday, April 22, 2014

New tool helps doctors better predict, prevent deadly respiratory failure after surgery, multicenter study says

A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, April 09, 2014

For frail, high-risk seniors, surgery decisions should be patient-centered, team-based and physician-led

Surgery for frail, senior citizen patients can be risky. A new patient-centered, team-based approach to deciding whether these high-risk patients will benefit from surgery is championed in an April 10 Perspective of the New England Journal of Medicine. The Perspective suggests that the decision to have surgery must balance the advantages and disadvantages of surgical and non-surgical treatment as well as the patient’s values and goals in a team-based setting that includes the patient, his or her family, the surgeon, the primary care physician and the physician anesthesiologist.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Ultrasound can identify pregnant women at risk for respiratory failure, research shows

An ultrasound of the lungs could help doctors quickly determine if a pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure, suggests preliminary research published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Rats’ brains may “remember” odor experienced while under general anesthesia, study suggests

Rats’ brains may remember odors they were exposed to while deeply anesthetized, suggests research in rats published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Cardiac arrest in pregnant women more common than you’d think

Although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported in the literature, suggests the first large U.S. study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of AnesthesiologyThe study, based on data for more than 56 million births, also found that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was often successful, and that the survival rate improved between 1998 and 2011.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

85 Percent of Heart Attacks and Injuries After Surgery Go Undetected Due to Lack of Symptoms

Without administering a simple blood test in the first few days after surgery, 85 percent of the heart attacks or injuries patients suffer could be missed, according to a study in the March issue of Anesthesiology. Globally, more than 8 million adults have heart attacks or injuries after surgery every year, and 10 percent of those patients die within 30 days.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Chance of falling after knee replacement does not increase with regional anesthesia

Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, suggests a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records in the March issue of Anesthesiology.

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Friday, January 24, 2014

Patient Participation in Surgical Safety Checklist a Win-Win

Patients feel safer – and likely are safer – when they receive a surgical safety checklist and request that their health care providers use it, suggests a pilot study being presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2014.

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Friday, January 24, 2014

System Leads to 47 Percent More 'On-Time' Surgeries, Study Says

Implementing a system to ensure the surgical team uses the most effective practices resulted in significant improvements in operating room (O.R.) performance, suggests research being presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2014.

The study and other research presented at the meeting reflect trends and substantial efforts being made in anesthesiology departments across the country to improve practice performance and patient care.

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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Research reveals doctors in training want real-time feedback

Anesthesiology residents want frequent feedback on their clinical performance, as well as evaluations of their performance compared to their fellow residents as a whole, according to a study in the January issue of Anesthesiology. The study conducted by faculty in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine demonstrates how an automated case evaluation tool can fulfill some of the new assessment requirements in the Milestones system of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which begins in July 2014 for all anesthesiology residencies.

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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Brain imaging reveals dynamic changes caused by pain medicines

 A study in the December issue of Anesthesiology suggests a role for brain imaging in the assessment and potential treatment of chronic pain.

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Friday, October 25, 2013

Epigenetics: A key to controlling acute and chronic pain, study says

Epigenetics, the study of changes in gene expression through mechanisms outside of the DNA structure, has been found to control a key pain receptor related to surgical incision pain, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology. This study reveals new information about pain regulation in the spinal cord.

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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Man’s best friends’ chronic pain relieved with new treatment, study finds

A single injection eased severe, chronic pain caused by late-stage bone cancer in dogs, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology. Dogs with bone cancer that received a neurotoxin injection had significantly more pain relief than those that got standard care without the injection.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Anesthesia technique may reduce breast cancer recurrence and death

Breast cancer patients who received the combination of a nerve block with general anesthesia for their breast cancer surgery had less cancer recurrence and were three times less likely to die than those who received only general anesthesia, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ annual meeting. Additionally, patients who received the nerve block needed less opioid pain relief from drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Simple blood test can diagnose lung and other cancers, study finds

Early-stage lung and prostate cancers as well as their recurrence can be detected with a simple blood test, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2013™ annual meeting. Serum-free fatty acids and their metabolites may be used as screening biomarkers to help diagnose early stages of cancer, as well as identify the probability of recovery and recurrence after tumor removal, researchers found.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

On-time operating room starts can be improved, increasing patient/staff satisfaction and cost savings

Late starts to the first surgical case of the day can be improved, according to two studies presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Improving efficiency potentially reduces costs, increases patient and staff satisfaction, and increases the number of cases that can be performed daily.


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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Recovery room complications decreased by nearly 60 percent, occur in less healthy patients

Complications in the recovery room decreased by 58 percent between 1990 and 2010, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. In a previous study completed in the late 1980s, recovery room complications occurred in 23.7 percent of the patients. Today, the complication rate is 9.9 percent. The study also found that less-healthy patients are more prone to recovery room complications.


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Monday, October 14, 2013

Postoperative delirium more likely in elderly patients who have diabetes, undergo longer surgeries or respond poorly to stress, study shows

Elderly surgical patients are more likely to suffer from debilitating post-operative delirium if they have diabetes, undergo longer surgery or respond poorly to stress, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. 


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Monday, October 14, 2013

Soldiers with certain gene variations more likely to develop chronic pain after amputation

Researchers have identified hundreds of variants in a patient’s DNA sequence or genetic code that predict which military service members are more likely to develop persistent, chronic pain after amputation, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. 


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Sunday, October 13, 2013

Study identifies which bipolar patients will respond to Ketamine therapy for depression, pain

Researchers have discovered how to determine which bipolar patients will benefit from Ketamine, a treatment commonly used for depression and pain relief, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting.

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Sunday, October 13, 2013

Peripheral nerve stimulation: promising long-term treatment for chronic headache sufferers

For the more than 45 million Americans who suffer from chronic headaches, relief may be on the way in the form of an electric pulse, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Electric stimulation of the peripheral nerve reduced average headache intensity by more than 70 percent.


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Sunday, October 13, 2013

New drug regimen reduces post-op nausea and vomiting by 80 percent in bariatric surgery patients

Ninety-seven percent of bariatric surgery patients avoided post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) with the addition of a second drug to the standard treatment given during surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting.

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Sunday, October 13, 2013

Fibromyalgia sufferers get significant pain relief from IV lidocaine

Patients with fibromyalgia resistant to more routine therapies have a new pain relief treatment available, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Intravenous (IV) lidocaine infusion provided significant pain relief to fibromyalgia patients, although the pain relief was much less for African-Americans and smokers.


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Sunday, October 13, 2013

Persistent pain following cardiac surgery can be predicted and reduced

The incidence of chronic pain following cardiac surgery can be reduced in patients when the drug pregabalin is used before surgery and for 14 days post-surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. The study also found that patients at risk of developing long-term post-operative persistent pain can be predicted by conducting pain sensitivity tests at the time of surgery.


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Sunday, October 13, 2013

People born with certain gene more likely to suffer long-term cognitive decline after heart surgery

Long-term memory loss, difficulty understanding verbal or written communication or impaired ability to pay attention may still occur five years after heart surgery if a patient has a certain gene variation, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. This gene was found to be related to a decline in cognitive capabilities compared to those who do not have the variation.

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Sunday, October 13, 2013

Decontaminating the sanitizer dispenser, giving health care workers their own hand gel reduces operating room contamination significantly

Simple remedies – from keeping the antibacterial gel dispenser clean to giving health care workers their own hand sanitizer – can help keep patients safe by decreasing contamination in operating and recovery rooms, suggest two studies presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting.


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Saturday, October 12, 2013

Women in labor can ditch the ice chips and drink a protein shake instead

Women in labor can enjoy a chocolate or vanilla protein shake during labor rather than being relegated to the tedium of ice chips, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Mothers who drank a protein drink during childbirth reported higher satisfaction rates, although nausea and vomiting rates were the same as for mothers who were only given ice chips.


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Saturday, October 12, 2013

Chronic pain treatment cools hot flashes in menopausal women

Menopausal women suffer from half as many hot flashes after receiving a  non-hormonal chronic pain treatment, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. The nerve block treatment interrupts the area of the brain that regulates body temperature, reducing moderate-to-severe hot flashes and alleviating depression in menopausal women, breast cancer patients and women in surgical menopause.

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Saturday, October 12, 2013

Kids having tonsils removed get better pain relief with IV acetaminophen

Using intravenous (IV) acetaminophen with narcotics provides more effective pain relief to children having tonsillectomies, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Additionally, the combination therapy saves costs due to reduced use of narcotics after surgery, reduced side effects and slightly quicker hospital discharge than in patients who receive narcotics alone.


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Saturday, October 12, 2013

When Millennial med students’ iPad® use for instruction goes up, personal use goes down

With the entry of “Millenials” into medical residency programs across the country, institutions have started to examine ways to improve programs to correspond with that generation’s learning behaviors and preferences. A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting found that Millennial residents use their iPad® to enhance their educational experience. Surprisingly, as residents increased use of their iPad® for educational purposes, their personal iPad® use decreased significantly.

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Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Study finds that identification and treatment of unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea before surgery improves outcomes

An estimated 80 percent of patients who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) go undiagnosed, including Deanna G. McNeil, a 72-year-old nurse from Toronto.

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Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Study looks for ‘best’ risk stratification tool so patients make the most informed surgical decision

Having the right tool to estimate surgical risk in patients at high risk for complications and death during and after surgery is crucially important, according to a study in the October issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Study finds use of labor-augmenting drug for extended time may contribute to reduced effect in controlling postpartum bleeding

With the number of maternal deaths on the rise in the United States, researchers found that a drug frequently used to augment or induce labor may contribute to postpartum bleeding, a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology notes.

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Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Study challenges assumption that uterine blood returns to mother’s circulation after delivery by cesarean section

In an examination comparing the effects of two drugs on blood pressure, pulse, heart rate and cardiac output in women having elective delivery by cesarean section, an old assumption that uterine blood is redistributed into the maternal circulation after delivery was challenged, according to a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Higher-frequency electrical stimulation of the spinal cord relieves pain faster by potentially utilizing different mechanisms

An animal study in the August issue of Anesthesiology suggests that higher-frequency electric current stimulation of the spinal cord reduced pain quicker and better reached nerves not affected by traditionally used frequencies.

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Optimal patient satisfaction tools revealed for physician anesthesiologists to ensure quality of care, study says

Using the right tool to measure patient satisfaction can guide improved health care quality, according to a study in the August issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Perioperative cardiac events after receiving laughing gas are not hereditary

A clinical trial published in the July issue of Anesthesiology may shed some light on whether nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”) causes an increased risk for cardiac events, including heart attacks after surgery, particularly among high-risk patients. 

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Anesthetic choice does not affect duration of hospitalization

The use of a less-expensive, longer-acting anesthetic (isoflurane) resulted in no difference in duration of hospitalization compared to the use of a more expensive, shorter-acting anesthetic (desflurane or sevoflurane), according to a study from the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Data from anesthesia information management systems help reduce costs and improve patient safety

Data from new electronic anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) can be used to assess surgical procedure- and institution-specific blood requirements, according to a study from the June issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Common brain processes of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness identified

A study from the June issue of Anesthesiology found feedback from the front region of the brain is a crucial building block for consciousness and that its disruption is associated with unconsciousness when the anesthetics ketamine, propofol or sevoflurane are administered.

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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Study reveals important genetic factors that could influence survival in sepsis patients

A study published in the June issue of Anesthesiology represents an important first step in establishing new therapeutic options targeting specific genetic areas that influence the occurrence and severity of sepsis – a life-threatening, whole-body response to infection.

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Wednesday, May 01, 2013

Study Finds Survival from Cardiac Arrest Highest in the Operating Room or Post-anesthesia Care Unit

A University of Michigan study from the “Online First” edition of Anesthesiology found cardiac arrest was associated with improved survival when it occurred in the operating room (O.R.) or post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) compared to other hospital locations.

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Anesthesia Type Affects Perioperative Outcomes in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

A study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology discovered that spinal or epidural anesthesia, types of regional anesthesia that numb patients from the abdomen to the toes, were associated with fewer postoperative complications and death than general anesthesia in patients undergoing primary hip or knee replacement.

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Anesthesiology Study Reveals Adult Behaviors Influence Children’s Coping in the Recovery Room After Surgery

A study in the April issue of Anesthesiology found adult behaviors influence children’s coping in the recovery room after surgery.

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Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Epidural Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management Is Key in Enhancing Recovery of Colorectal Surgery Patients

A new study in the March issue of Anesthesiology suggests epidural analgesia (EA) may be a more effective component in the perioperative care of patients undergoing elective open colorectal surgery than the proposed alternative, continuous wound infiltration of local anesthetics (CWI).

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013

February Anesthesiology Studies Address the Relief of Pain in Patients After Breast Cancer Surgery and in Labor

Two studies from the February issue of Anesthesiology address the relief of pain. As pain physicians, anesthesiologists are committed to conducting research to better understand and treat patients suffering from acute and chronic pain.

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Is Childbirth Linked to Development of Chronic Pain?

Chronic pain from childbirth is remarkably rare, according to a study from the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Study Finds Genetic Variation That Could Help Predict Mortality in Patients Suffering Sepsis

A study in the January 2013 issue of Anesthesiology offers evidence that variations in what is called the NFκB gene could play an important role in helping to determine the survival rate of patients who acquire sepsis, a condition in which the body is overwhelmed by infection, and which is the leading cause of death in hospitals.

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Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Study Indicates Opiates Already in Body May Encourage Cancer Growth, Certain Medications Could Slow It

A study led by University of Chicago researcher Patrick A. Singleton, Ph.D. and published in the journal Anesthesiology has shown that, even without the addition of further opioids such as morphine, opioids already in the body can enhance the malignant tendencies of human cancer cells.

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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Study Finds Blood Lactate and Lactate Clearance Important Prognostic Variables for Mortality in Trauma Patients

Early after trauma, changes in blood lactate over time, defined as lactate clearance, provide additional information predicting mortality in trauma patients according to a study from the December issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Inhaled Nitric Oxide Improves Outcomes in Mice Resuscitated with Stored Blood

Inhaled nitric oxide reduced the adverse effects of transfusing stored blood in mice, according to a study from the December issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

First National Survey of Anesthesiologists Over 50 Identifies Factors That Could Influence Predicted Physician Shortage

A large, first-of-its-kind national survey of older anesthesiologists has gathered important data that could be used by physicians and their employers to prepare for an expected undersupply of anesthesiologists in the near future.

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Two Commonly Used Anesthetics Produce Different Metabolic Patterns in Children’s Unconscious Brains

Two commonly used anesthetics produce different metabolic patterns in the brains of unconscious children, according to a study from the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Diabetes Notification System to Improve Perioperative Outcomes

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2012™ annual meeting revealed that adding increased glucose monitoring throughout surgical procedures will allow anesthesiologists to optimize the perioperative and surgical care of millions of diabetic patients throughout the world.

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Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Cost Savings, Successful Outcomes, Found in New Anesthesiologist Model of Care

Using a comprehensive preoperative triage system directed by anesthesiologists, a team of researchers at the Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans has shown marked reductions in patient charges for common medical tests – without sacrificing quality of care and successful outcomes.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Study Finds Rise in Maternal Sepsis-related Mortality

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting  reports that severity and death rates are increasing in pregnant and postpartum women with sepsis. More than 30 percent of mothers who develop sepsis will experience some type of organ dysfunction.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Is Immediate and Long-term Pain After a Motor Vehicle Collision Hereditary?

Two studies presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting found that hereditary genes were responsible for the amount and type of pain experienced after a motor vehicle collision (MVC).

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Fiberoptic Laryngoscopy: Yes, There's an App for That

A study presented during the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting has shown that an iPhone application called iLarynx™ was so effective at simulating fiberoptic bronchoscopy that when app-trained students eventually used a real bronchoscope on a manikin...

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Study Finds Link Between Robotic Prostate Surgery and Increased Eye Injury Over 10-year Period

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting found that during the years 2000-2009, eye injuries during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) increased nearly 10-fold, from a .07 percent incidence rate to .42 percent.

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Monday, October 15, 2012

Early Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Leads to Greater Risk for Respiratory Disease

Research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting revealed cigarette smoke adversely affects the developing human airway, especially in prematurity. Fetuses and premature babies exposed to cigarette smoke are at greater risk for developing childhood respiratory diseases, such as asthma.

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Monday, October 15, 2012

Ethnicity and Language Said to Influence Negative Postoperative Behavioral Change in Children

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2012™ annual meeting found children’s negative behavioral change after surgery differs among Spanish- and English-speaking White and Hispanic families.

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Monday, October 15, 2012

Research Reveals Decline in Illicit Drug Abuse; Prescription Drug Abuse on the Rise

Research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting showed while there has been an encouraging decline in illicit drug abuse across most major metropolitan areas in recent years, prescription drug abuse is climbing.

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Sunday, October 14, 2012

iPad Helps Duke University Team Keep an Eye on Your Heart

A team of researchers from Duke University speaking at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting revealed the development of a new 3-D tool that enables trainees in transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to have real-time instruction in obtaining and interpreting high-quality images of the heart and major vessels.

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

'Ancient Dream' of Pain-free Labor for Chinese Women Becoming Reality

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting revealed sometimes dramatic findings from a 10-year initiative called the “No Pain Labor N’ Delivery China Mission.”

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Botox Injections Proven to Reduce Chronic Neck and Cervical Muscle Pain

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2012™ annual meeting revealed Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX) injections significantly improve pain and quality of life in people with chronic bilateral posterior neck and shoulder myofascial pain syndrome.

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Study Finds Language Disparities Among Hispanic Women in Labor Impact Epidural Use

A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting found the role of women’s primary language impacts whether or not they receive an epidural for pain relief during labor.

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Anesthesiology Study Finds Ultrasounds Effective in Increasing Diagnostic and Therapeutic Accuracy in Critical Care Patients

A study published in the October issue of Anesthesiology analyzed the effectiveness of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis and treatment of critical care patients.

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Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Study Finds Point-of-care Testing Algorithms Effective in Reducing Perioperative Bleeding Complications in Cardiac Surgery Patients

A study from the September issue of Anesthesiology determined that certain blood clotting treatment algorithms helped decrease blood transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery patients and were associated with improved outcomes and hospital cost-savings.

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Study Finds Epidural Analgesia Not to Blame for Fever in Laboring Women

A study from the August issue of Anesthesiology provides evidence contrary to prior reports that fever in laboring women is associated with epidural analgesia.

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Wednesday, June 20, 2012

The Contribution of Genetics, Environmental Factors and Demographics to the Side Effects of Opioid Pain Killers

A study in the July issue of Anesthesiology analyzes why some patients are more susceptible to problems caused by opioids, corner stone medications for the treatment of acute and chronic pain.

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