Anesthesiology Journal and Other Scientific Press Releases

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Wednesday, April 09, 2014

For frail, high-risk seniors, surgery decisions should be patient-centered, team-based and physician-led

Surgery for frail, senior citizen patients can be risky. A new patient-centered, team-based approach to deciding whether these high-risk patients will benefit from surgery is championed in an April 10 Perspective of the New England Journal of Medicine. The Perspective suggests that the decision to have surgery must balance the advantages and disadvantages of surgical and non-surgical treatment as well as the patient’s values and goals in a team-based setting that includes the patient, his or her family, the surgeon, the primary care physician and the physician anesthesiologist.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Ultrasound can identify pregnant women at risk for respiratory failure, research shows

An ultrasound of the lungs could help doctors quickly determine if a pregnant woman with preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure, suggests preliminary research published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Rats’ brains may “remember” odor experienced while under general anesthesia, study suggests

Rats’ brains may remember odors they were exposed to while deeply anesthetized, suggests research in rats published in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Cardiac arrest in pregnant women more common than you’d think

Although cardiac arrest during childbirth is rare, it may be two times more common than previously reported in the literature, suggests the first large U.S. study on the potentially deadly condition published in the April issue of AnesthesiologyThe study, based on data for more than 56 million births, also found that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was often successful, and that the survival rate improved between 1998 and 2011.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

85 Percent of Heart Attacks and Injuries After Surgery Go Undetected Due to Lack of Symptoms

Without administering a simple blood test in the first few days after surgery, 85 percent of the heart attacks or injuries patients suffer could be missed, according to a study in the March issue of Anesthesiology. Globally, more than 8 million adults have heart attacks or injuries after surgery every year, and 10 percent of those patients die within 30 days.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Chance of falling after knee replacement does not increase with regional anesthesia

Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, suggests a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records in the March issue of Anesthesiology.

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Friday, January 24, 2014

System Leads to 47 Percent More 'On-Time' Surgeries, Study Says

Implementing a system to ensure the surgical team uses the most effective practices resulted in significant improvements in operating room (O.R.) performance, suggests research being presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2014.

The study and other research presented at the meeting reflect trends and substantial efforts being made in anesthesiology departments across the country to improve practice performance and patient care.

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Friday, January 24, 2014

Patient Participation in Surgical Safety Checklist a Win-Win

Patients feel safer – and likely are safer – when they receive a surgical safety checklist and request that their health care providers use it, suggests a pilot study being presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 2014.

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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Research reveals doctors in training want real-time feedback

Anesthesiology residents want frequent feedback on their clinical performance, as well as evaluations of their performance compared to their fellow residents as a whole, according to a study in the January issue of Anesthesiology. The study conducted by faculty in the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine demonstrates how an automated case evaluation tool can fulfill some of the new assessment requirements in the Milestones system of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which begins in July 2014 for all anesthesiology residencies.

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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Brain imaging reveals dynamic changes caused by pain medicines

 A study in the December issue of Anesthesiology suggests a role for brain imaging in the assessment and potential treatment of chronic pain.

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Friday, October 25, 2013

Epigenetics: A key to controlling acute and chronic pain, study says

Epigenetics, the study of changes in gene expression through mechanisms outside of the DNA structure, has been found to control a key pain receptor related to surgical incision pain, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology. This study reveals new information about pain regulation in the spinal cord.

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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Man’s best friends’ chronic pain relieved with new treatment, study finds

A single injection eased severe, chronic pain caused by late-stage bone cancer in dogs, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology. Dogs with bone cancer that received a neurotoxin injection had significantly more pain relief than those that got standard care without the injection.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Anesthesia technique may reduce breast cancer recurrence and death

Breast cancer patients who received the combination of a nerve block with general anesthesia for their breast cancer surgery had less cancer recurrence and were three times less likely to die than those who received only general anesthesia, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ annual meeting. Additionally, patients who received the nerve block needed less opioid pain relief from drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Recovery room complications decreased by nearly 60 percent, occur in less healthy patients

Complications in the recovery room decreased by 58 percent between 1990 and 2010, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. In a previous study completed in the late 1980s, recovery room complications occurred in 23.7 percent of the patients. Today, the complication rate is 9.9 percent. The study also found that less-healthy patients are more prone to recovery room complications.


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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

On-time operating room starts can be improved, increasing patient/staff satisfaction and cost savings

Late starts to the first surgical case of the day can be improved, according to two studies presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Improving efficiency potentially reduces costs, increases patient and staff satisfaction, and increases the number of cases that can be performed daily.


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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Simple blood test can diagnose lung and other cancers, study finds

Early-stage lung and prostate cancers as well as their recurrence can be detected with a simple blood test, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2013™ annual meeting. Serum-free fatty acids and their metabolites may be used as screening biomarkers to help diagnose early stages of cancer, as well as identify the probability of recovery and recurrence after tumor removal, researchers found.

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Monday, October 14, 2013

Postoperative delirium more likely in elderly patients who have diabetes, undergo longer surgeries or respond poorly to stress, study shows

Elderly surgical patients are more likely to suffer from debilitating post-operative delirium if they have diabetes, undergo longer surgery or respond poorly to stress, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. 


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Monday, October 14, 2013

Soldiers with certain gene variations more likely to develop chronic pain after amputation

Researchers have identified hundreds of variants in a patient’s DNA sequence or genetic code that predict which military service members are more likely to develop persistent, chronic pain after amputation, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. 


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Sunday, October 13, 2013

New drug regimen reduces post-op nausea and vomiting by 80 percent in bariatric surgery patients

Ninety-seven percent of bariatric surgery patients avoided post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) with the addition of a second drug to the standard treatment given during surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting.

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Sunday, October 13, 2013

People born with certain gene more likely to suffer long-term cognitive decline after heart surgery

Long-term memory loss, difficulty understanding verbal or written communication or impaired ability to pay attention may still occur five years after heart surgery if a patient has a certain gene variation, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. This gene was found to be related to a decline in cognitive capabilities compared to those who do not have the variation.

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